Tuesday, July 31, 2012

Contagion of the Gods Giveaway

A recent book I edited by Scott Rhine is being given away in ebook today only. This fantasy explores the relationship between Greek gods, mortals, and the future. Magic is in the air, and in the blood. Grab your free copy on amazon.com today.

Here's my review:
I was given this book to edit and enjoyed it immensely, like I have all of Scott Rhine's books. I loved Pythias' story: his painful childhood, the political corruptions and truths still present in today's society, and the manipulative way he plays both sides for the betterment of humanity. This is an entertaining tale that I highly recommend. In addition, when I first saw the cover, I was blown away. Contagion of the Gods isn't just a pretty face, but great inside and out. Pick up your copy today if you enjoy tales of Gods, fantasy, and adventure reminiscent of Homer's story of Odysseus.

After you give it a read, help others find and enjoy such an entertaining book by leaving a review on Amazon and/or Goodreads.com.

Weston Kincade ~ Author of Invisible Dawn, A Life of Death, and Strange Circumstances

Monday, July 23, 2012

Contest Winner Update

Yesterday I received an email from Kim Pyrros, one of our contest winners. It included a great picture that I wanted to share:

"Enjoying a day at the pool! Reading my new book..."


Thanks for the update, Kim. I'm glad you're enjoying the new book and shirt. Looks great.

Weston Kincade ~ Author of Invisible Dawn, A Life of Death, and Strange Circumstances

Monday, July 16, 2012

Strange Circumstances Weekend Giveaway!

This upcoming weekend, July 21st and 22nd, is a great time to get free books, especially short stories that can be read while waiting in the doctor's office, auto shop, on your break at work, and many other places. So, here's a little information about Strange Circumstances, a co-written book by Marshall J. Stephens, David Chrisley, and myself.

The future's a gamble. Few people know what they really want, and those that reach it often find that it isn't what they expected. Strange Circumstances is an anthology of stories exploring the predictability of fate and destiny . . . or rather their unpredictability.

In the twelve twisted tales and fifteen flash-fiction pieces, Strange Circumstances explores the boundaries of our universe to see what lurks in the unknown, hidden within the mysteries of science, magic, extraterrestrials, religion and the paranormal. Amid celebrities who hit their peak and vanish, a tree that grows up from the floor of a moving train car, unspeakable conspiracy, monstrous espionage, and wicked sorcery, there is something within these pages for anyone who enjoys dark tales and twists of every sort.

The ebook will be up for free this weekend on Amazon.com.



Weston Kincade ~ Author of Invisible Dawn, A Life of Death, and Strange Circumstances

Thursday, July 5, 2012

ol'." ol.'" or ol'". Which is it?

• Does the period go before the apostrophe when a dialect-inflected word of your dialog ends the sentence?
• What if the apostrophe is actually a single quote emphasizing a word within a sentence or setting off a movie title like 'Black Hawk Down,' would the comma or period go before or after the single quote?
• How about if you have a list of them?


As an editor, I just wanted to clarify on these questions. Some of them have rarely been addressed on the web, yet they are common mistakes made by many, many writers. I ran into this problem early on in my writing and editing careers and have consistently encountered them time and again while editing other authors' works. I've researched the answers in the Chicago Manual of Style (CMOS) and throughout the web. After a good bit of searching, I discovered that some of the answers depend on the situation and your location.

First, lets look at the first related group of questions regarding dialog.

Questions: "The dan' dog was ol'" Would you place the period before the single quotation mark being used in place of the letter or not? What if your example isn't dialect, but a plural possessive that ends the sentence? "Mom, we went to Martins' house, but they had to go. So we wound up at the Nelsons'" Where would the period or comma go?

Answer: It sounds a bit like something Mark Twain would have written, and while many authors attempt to avoid the inflection of missing letters as dialect would dictate, many writers prefer to stay true to a character's voice. However, they still wish to follow proper grammar rules as dictated by CMOS and other authorities. CMOS says always place commas and periods before quotation marks. The key here is when you have a missing letter, you are replacing it with an apostrophe, not a single quotation mark. So, according to CMOS, no period or comma should go between a word and its apostrophe. That means both examples should be punctuated like this:

"The dan' dog was ol'."
"Mom, we went to Martins' house, but they had to go. So we wound up at the Nelsons'."

If you have a tagline following it, always remember that the period needs to be replaced with a comma, but the placement won't change.


Now to answer the second group of punctuation questions mentioned at the beginning of this post.

Questions: What if the apostrophe is actually a single quote emphasizing a word within a sentence or setting off a movie title like 'Black Hawk Down' would the comma or period go before or after the single quote? How about if you have a list of them?

Answer: These are very good questions and for this, it truly depends on your location. As I said before, CMOS is basically the Bible for writers. They say that all periods and commas go inside quotation marks, both single and double.

This means that the correct way to punctuate a sentence using this example would be:
I just watched the movie 'Black Hawk Down.' The period is inside the closing single quotation mark.

The same goes for if you have a list:
We sat through an entire movie marathon and watched "A Life of Crime," "Tango and Cash," and 'Black Hawk Down.'

An additional error I have often seen people make with punctuation regarding single quotes happens when they use them to emphasize a word. For example:
I wouldn't say it was enjoyed by 'all'

Here the period again goes inside the closing single quotation mark, so it would be:
I wouldn't say it was enjoyed by 'all.'

This creates problems for some writers, especially programmers when one letter or punctuation mark can entirely change something. For instance, imagine if you are writing instructions and telling a programmer to change a section of code to "header." Because of this rule, you've just told your programmer to add a period to the end of the header command, even though that may not be what you intended. While I'm not much of a programmer, I know enough that this can entirely change the program and how it works. I don't necessarily agree with this logic, and neither do a lot of other people. Unfortunately, this is the accepted rule throughout the US.

However, as I said, your location and where you're shopping your writing matters in this case. In Britain there is an accepted system that is somewhat more logical. The accepted form in Britain requires the author or editor to determine if the quoted material is part of the sentence being punctuated or separate. So, for the cases above, most British authorities would place the commas and/or periods outside the quoted material.

Hope these tidbits of punctuation knowledge help.


Weston Kincade ~ Author of Invisible Dawn, A Life of Death, and Strange Circumstances

Wednesday, July 4, 2012

July Fourth Two for the Price of None eBook Giveaway

Get ready readers! For those of you with a little spare time this July Fourth Holiday, you can get two books free. If you liked Invisible Dawn and/or A Life of Death and wish to share it with friends, now's their opportunity. July 4th and 5th I'll be giving away free copies of both books on Amazon.
If you haven't read one or both of them, take advantage of this free opportunity. Tell your friends so they can get a copy too. Just follow the Amazon link above.

Happy reading!

Weston Kincade ~ Author of Invisible Dawn, A Life of Death, and Strange Circumstances

Sunday, July 1, 2012

Vote for the Cover Art to Salvation

Okay, the 2012 Summer Contest is over and the winners have been announced on the contest page. The tab for it is in the upper right hand corner. They will be contacted via email with prizes and for address information. In addition, the three best cover images for the Altered Realities sequel to Invisible Dawn, titled Salvation, have been selected. Surprisingly, they were all by the same artist, Eleanor Bennett. Here is a little about her:

Bio:Eleanor Leonne Bennett is a 16 year old internationally award winning photographer and artist who has won first places with National Geographic, The World Photography Organisation, Nature's Best Photography, Papworth Trust, Mencap, The Woodland trust and Postal Heritage. Her photography has been published in the Telegraph , The Guardian, BBC News Website and on the cover of books and magazines in the United states and Canada. Her art is globally exhibited , having shown work in London, Paris, Indonesia, Los Angeles,Florida, Washington, Scotland,Wales, Ireland,Canada,Spain,Germany, Japan, Australia and The Environmental Photographer of the year Exhibition (2011) amongst many other locations. She was also the only person from the UK to have her work displayed in the National Geographic and Airbus run See The Bigger Picture global exhibition tour with the United Nations International Year Of Biodiversity 2010.

You can contact her at eleanor (dot) ellieonline (at) gmail (dot) com and find more of her work at www.eleanorleonnebennett.zenfolio.com.

Now, readers and fans will get the chance to select their favorite choice of the three by responding to this post. Just say which number you like best, and feel free to tell why. However, no anonymous posts will be counted.

Your selections are:

1.

2.

3.

At the end of one week, that's 11:59pm next Sunday, the votes will be tallied to see which image will be used in Salvation's upcoming cover. Thanks for participating, and remember to enjoy a good book this week.

Weston Kincade ~ Author of Invisible Dawn, A Life of Death, and Strange Circumstances